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very little

📝 Description
"Very little" is an adverbial phrase often used to quantify an almost negligible amount of something. "Very" is an adverb that intensifies the meaning of the adjective "little", thereby emphasizing the smallness or insignificance of the quantity or degree.
📝 Example Sentence
"Despite the very little time she had, Mary managed to finish her work."
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very

📝 Description
"Very" is an adverb in English that's used to emphasize adjectives or adverbs. It can heighten the degree of a certain quality (like size, amount, or extent). For instance, "You're very smart" signifies a high degree of intelligence. It's derived from the Middle English term "verray," meaning true or real.
📝 Example Sentence
"Very often, we underestimate the power of a simple smile to brighten someone's day."
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little

📝 Description
"Little" is an adjective in English frequently used to describe small size, amount, duration, or degree. It can also be used as an adverb to indicate to a small extent or degree. It's derived from Old English 'lytel', which originated from Proto-Germanic 'luttilaz'.
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