📝 Fingerspelling
d
Fingerspelling d
o
Fingerspelling o
y
Fingerspelling y
o
Fingerspelling o
u
Fingerspelling u
w
Fingerspelling w
a
Fingerspelling a
n
Fingerspelling n
t
Fingerspelling t
t
Fingerspelling t
o
Fingerspelling o
h
Fingerspelling h
a
Fingerspelling a
n
Fingerspelling n
g
Fingerspelling g
o
Fingerspelling o
u
Fingerspelling u
t
Fingerspelling t

do you want to hang out

📝 Description
"Do you want to hang out?" is an informal English language phrase. It's typically used as an invitation to spend time together leisurely and socially. 'Hang out' is an idiomatic expression implying relaxation or casual social interaction. It's versatile, applied to various contexts from grabbing coffee to watching a movie.
📝 Example Sentence
"Hey, do you want to hang out after work today?"
📝 Fingerspelling
d
Fingerspelling d
o
Fingerspelling o
y
Fingerspelling y
o
Fingerspelling o
u
Fingerspelling u
w
Fingerspelling w
a
Fingerspelling a
n
Fingerspelling n
t
Fingerspelling t
t
Fingerspelling t
o
Fingerspelling o
h
Fingerspelling h
a
Fingerspelling a
n
Fingerspelling n
g
Fingerspelling g
o
Fingerspelling o
u
Fingerspelling u
t
Fingerspelling t

do

📝 Description
"Do" is an auxiliary verb in English, often used in questions, negations, and emphatic expressions. It can also be a main verb indicating action or task completion. As an auxiliary verb, it helps form interrogative and negative sentences. It's one of the most versatile words in English language.
📝 Example Sentence
"Do you know that doing simple tasks daily can make a big difference in life?"
📝 Fingerspelling
d
Fingerspelling d
o
Fingerspelling o

you

📝 Description
The word "you" in English is a pronoun. It's second-person, used to refer to the person or group of people that the speaker is addressing. It's unique as it can be singular or plural and can be used as both subjective (e.g., "You are nice.") and objective (e.g., "I told you.").
📝 Example Sentence
"You are the reason I smile every day."
📝 Fingerspelling
y
Fingerspelling y
o
Fingerspelling o
u
Fingerspelling u

want

📝 Description
"Want" is a verb in English. Derived from Old Norse 'vanta', it primarily expresses a desire or need for something or someone. It can also mean lack or be in need of. Example: I want a cup of tea. Here, it signifies the speaker's desire for tea.
📝 Example Sentence
"Everyone wants to be happy, but not all know what truly brings happiness."
📝 Fingerspelling
w
Fingerspelling w
a
Fingerspelling a
n
Fingerspelling n
t
Fingerspelling t

to

📝 Description
"To" is a preposition in English. It is used to show movement or direction towards a place, point or person. It can also show a relation in terms of possession, purpose, or cause. In infinitive verb forms, "to" precedes the base form of a verb to express purpose or intention.
📝 Example Sentence
"To be or not to be, that is the question."
📝 Fingerspelling
t
Fingerspelling t
o
Fingerspelling o

out

📝 Description
"Out" is a preposition, adverb, or adjective in English. As a preposition, it signifies not in a location, like "he is out of the office." As an adverb, it could mean an action done completely like "the fire is out." As an adjective, it could describe something that is no longer fashionable or in vogue, like "that style is out."
📝 Fingerspelling
o
Fingerspelling o
u
Fingerspelling u
t
Fingerspelling t

Other Related Words & Videos

The following signs and videos are connected in some form or another to the given search phrase: do you want to hang out

thank you
thank you in ASL
person
person in ASL
people
people in ASL